Category Archives: Bill Brosig

Right Size at the Right Price

Do you know about the MS-25?
Cost Effective 25 Point Addressable Fire Panel

Today, many fast foods restaurants, small retail and office buildings are renovating their buildings. In the process of renovating the building some are updating from the traditional conventional fire alarm control panel to a small addressable fire alarm control panel.
Fire-Lite Alarms has an addressable system worth serious consideration for applications where two to five zone conventional fire alarm systems traditionally are used. The MS-25 introduces a feature set that is new to this segment: pin-point identification of alarms and troubles, false alarm prevention via detector drift compensation and automatic maintenance alerts. Real installer benefits such as easy code-wheel addressed detectors; a “JumpStart” programming feature and a built-in programming browser make system commissioning a definite time-saver. In addition to supporting any combination of addressable detectors and modules, along with the manual pull station, this system also utilizes a single loop of standard wire for real cost-savings.

Another enhancement for the MS-25 is Remote Annunciator connectivity. The annunciator is a compact, backlit, LCD remote annunciator and provides system status for AC Power, Alarm, Trouble, Supervisory and Alarm Silenced conditions.

With these enhancements and the savings of a single SLC replacing multi-zoned wiring, this small addressable system is worth serious consideration. It’s the right-sized panel, giving “Addressable” benefits at a low Conventional panel cost.

Finally, Fire-Lite Alarms is here to help you in your endeavor. Fire-Lite Alarms has 60 years in the business, is the leader in non-proprietary, and has great tools to help you learn about the products. Visit our website to learn more about MS-25.

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

Why is Fire Alarm Strobe Synchronization so Important?

According to the Epilepsy Foundation’s website, 1 in 26 people in the United States will develop epilepsy at some point in their lifetime. The purpose of synchronization is to ensure that the fire alarm system visible signals do not cause a photosensitive epileptic to initiate a seizure.

NFPA 72 – 1996 edition and later editions stipulate that strobe synchronization shall comply with Americans with Disabilities Act. Consequently, the NFPA code requires that the strobes are to be synchronized when more than one is visible from any field of view. The manner in which fire alarm systems accomplish this is through strobe synchronization.

What is strobe synchronization? It is a protocol that is used on a notification appliance circuit (NAC) to allow the strobes to flash in “sync”. Today, most Fire Alarm Control Panels and NAC Power Supplies have Built-in Strobe Synchronization protocols.

Visit our website to learn more about the Built-in Strobe Synchronization protocols feature in the Conventional fire alarm panels and Addressable fire alarm panels. Also, view one of our pre-recorded webinars on NAC Strobe Sync.

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

What is an Isolator Module for an SLC Loop?

An Isolator Module automatically isolates wire-to-wire short circuits on a signaling line circuit (SLC) loop. The isolator module also limits the number of modules or detectors that may be rendered inoperative by a short circuit fault on the SLC Loop. If a wire-to-wire short occurs, the isolator module automatically creates and open-circuit (disconnect) the SLC loop. When the short circuit condition is corrected, the isolator module automatically reconnects the isolated section of the SLC loop.

NFPA 72, 2013 Edition, Chapter 23: Protected premises fire alarm systems a requirement was added in paragraph 23.6.1 that limits the maximum number of addressable devices (50) that can be out of service due to a single fault on a pathway. This will require more diligence in system layout and the potential use of isolation modules to limit the number of devices that could be affected by a single fault.

Fire-Lite Alarms offers I300 module (one circuit) and newly rISO-6 Moduleeleased ISO-6 Six Isolator Module (six circuits). The I300 and ISO-6 Fault Isolator Module is used with Fire-Lite’s addressable fire alarm control panels (FACPs) to protect the system against wire-to-wire short circuits on the SLC loop.

Don’t forget, Fire-Lite Alarms is here to help you in your endeavor! Fire-Lite Alarms has 60 years in the business, is the leader in non-proprietary, and has great tools to help you learn about the products. Visit our website to learn more about I300 module and newly released ISO-6 Six Isolator Module.

*In Canada?  You can check out the ISO-6A model!

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

 

 

 

Get Started with a Site Survey for SWIFT Wireless!

Fire-Lite Alarms’ SWIFT wireless fire detection system detects fire, just like their wired counterparts, while providing installation flexibility in a wireless format. Before you get started, a site survey is recommended to assess and qualify the site prior to installing a SWIFT wireless fire detection system.

The site survey consists of two tests:
Link Quality Test
A link quality test is a quick and repeatable test that provides immediate feedback on device connectivity. The link quality test sends data from one device to another to test for data loss and measure the signal strength.

RF Scan Test
A Radio Frequency scan test is conducted to assess and measure the background noise and interference from other wireless systems if any, in the site. The RF Scan test can be conducted individually or following the link quality test.

After both tests are completed, the results of the site survey can be also obtained using SWIFT Tools. The information provided by SWIFT Tools is used for site qualification, maximum device spacing identification, and configuring the wireless mesh network. This helps to ensure the reliability and performance of the wireless network in the wireless fire alarm system.

How can you get started?
To do a simple wireless fire detection system site survey, you just need SWIFT wireless smoke detectors. If you would like to see the detailed results of the site survey, you also need the W-USB and SWIFT Tools.

Fire-Lite Alarms is here to help you in your endeavor to protect building occupants. Fire-Lite Alarms has 60 years in the business, is the leader in non-proprietary, and has great tools to help you learn about the products. Visit our website to learn more about the SWIFT wireless fire detection system. Also, view one of our pre-recorded webinars on SWIFT Wireless Tools & Techniques.

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

The Importance of Fire Alarm Testing

Fire and Life Safety systems require regular testing and maintenance. Just like an automobile, regular testing and maintenance keeps the system running at peak performance and ready to detect and respond to an emergency. Without proper inspection and testing and you may not know how or if, your system will function properly until an emergency occurs.

In order to meet federal certification requirements and state requirements, fire alarm systems are required to be inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. In the 2013 edition, Chapter 14 (Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance) outlines these requirements for fire and life safety systems. Fire alarm control panels provide features that make it easier to perform these tasks.

Today, most Fire Alarm Control Panels have a built in Walk Test feature is used to test a fire alarm system to ensure everything works properly. By placing the Fire Alarm Control Panel into Walk Test mode, a technician can activate a device, which then gives an indication at the Fire Alarm Control Panel. Depending on the setup, the panel may or may not momentarily sound the signals. After the device activates, it will automatically restore and then the technician can go on to the next device to test. This allows for a technician to test a system without having someone to reset the Fire Alarm Control Panel each time.

An inspection, testing, and maintenance program is essential for the reliable performance of the fire alarm system. In addition to maintaining proper levels of protection, proper Inspection, Testing and Maintenance can help reduce the expense of emergency repairs and costly false alarms.

Having a working fire alarm system installed in your building saves lives!

Finally, Fire-Lite Alarms is here to help you in your endeavor. Fire-Lite Alarms has 60 years in the business, is the leader in non-proprietary, and has great tools to help you learn about the products. Visit our website to learn more about the Walk Test feature in the MS-9050UD, MS-9200UDLS, and MS-9600(UD)LS. Also, view one of our pre-recorded webinars on Understanding Commissioning and System Acceptance Testing by Jack Poole (engineering consultant and industry expert).

 

 About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

 

 

Why do we need a Backup for Audio Amplifiers?

National fire codes require voice evacuation systems in places of assembly with over 300-person occupancy, in theaters with more than one screen, and in buildings where an occupied floor is higher than 75 feet above the exit level. Government applications typically have more stringent requirements and voice evacuation (as part of an ECS/MNS) is more of the norm.

Some installations such as government buildings, military bases or college campuses, survivability can be a key requirement when installing an Emergency Communication System (ECS). Some specifications mandate that if a primary amplifier fails, a back-up amplifier is required to take over so that critical life safety messages can be delivered to building occupants during an emergency.
Providing backup capability for all speaker circuits will allow the Voice/Mass Notification panel to be used in more ECS jobs and provide better survivability and peace of mind to End-users and Building owners while meeting more Local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ’s) requirements.

Fire-Lite Alarms meets these requirements with the award winning ECS solution – Emergency Command Center (ECC). To learn more about the ECC and the backup capability of the Distributed Audio Amplifiers products, you can visit our website at www.firelite.com.

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Channel Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.


Do Your Homework When Getting Into the Fire Business

We have seen a number of installing contractors showing interest in getting into the fire & life safety industry. It’s a noble cause to protect people and property from fire and non-fire emergencies and is a great industry to expand your business. Since its serious business, it’s important to learn about the regulations and what it would take to get started.

The first place to start is with the fire alarm code books. There are several publications relating to fire alarm codes and standards, some of which include: NFPA 101 Life Safety Code, NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code, NFPA 70 National Electrical Code, Fire Protection Handbook and Fire Alarm Signaling Systems Handbook (Excellence book).

Next, NICET (National Institute for Certification of Engineering Technologies) provides national certification that is required in jurisdictions to work on fire alarm systems. There are also several web sites, including: nfpa.org, nicet.org, and firemarshals.org, where you can find information on a national and local level. NFPA(National Fire Protection Association) offers the following educational programs: Self-Guided Online Courses, On-Site Seminars, Webinars, Training videos and Certification Programs.

Also, if you are just getting into the fire alarm business, a good place to start is getting to know the local fire marshal or AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction). They should be able to tell you what is required to work on fire alarm systems in your area.

Finally, Fire-Lite Alarms is here to help you in your endeavor. With over 60 years in the business, Fire-Lite is the leader in non-proprietary, unrestricted fire alarm and emergency communication systems for commercial applications. Our nationwide training is lead by NICET Certified Trainers and we have developed some great FREE tools to help you learn about our products including online training courses and how-to videos.

 

About the Author
Bill Brosig is a Product Manager with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

Any Time. Any Where. – Secure Access to Live Messaging with the RTZM Module

NEW! The Remote Telephone Zone Module (ECC-RTZM) allows for secure access to the Award winning Emergency Command Center (ECC-50/100) panel via cell phone or a remote telephone means. An authorized personnel can broadcast live message or prerecorded messages over selected speaker zone(s) on the ECC-50/100 panel by calling into the ECC-RTZM and initiating events.

ECC-RTZM Features and Benefits

  • Allows for secure and remote activation of the ECC-50/100 panel.
  • Accessible from any land line or cellular phone.
  • Live messaging or pre-programmed messages can be activated.
  • Allows for all call or Selective Zone activation.
  • Provides password based authentication for limited access and security.

Click here for more information.

 

About the Author:
Bill Brosig is a Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms and Honeywell Power with more than 25 years in the Life Safety business and a NICET IV certification. Bill focuses on the customer experience surrounding current offerings and new product applications.

Webinar: October 29th – Resources for Growth from Fire-Lite Alarms

Join us for a 60 minute review and discussion on the variety of free tools & resources available from Fire-Lite Alarms. These tools were created to help you not only support the products that you install and sell, but also to help GROW your business.
Date: October 29th
Time: 11 am to 12 Noon (Eastern)
Register Here

Presenter Information:

Bill Brosig, Fire-Lite Product Manager, will take you through the latest updates to software tools such as: LiteConfigurator, LiteSpec, PSTools and more. With the addition of our award winning Emergency Command Center (ECC) products earlier in 2013, there have been some great updates made to the library of tools.

Liz Richards, Fire-Lite Marketing Communications Manager, will show off the “Social-Lite” aspect of Fire-Lite Alarms.  We’ve utilized social media to build another route of communication direct from us to you, in addition to creating a library of marketing materials, geared toward specific products and markets, to support your sales efforts.