Tag Archives: Wireless

Spotlight on Software: Lite-Configurator Now Supports SWIFT™ Wireless

Lite-Configurator is an easy to use FREE program that allows you to configure a bill of materials for Fire-Lite’s addressable and conventional control panels. The Lite-Configurator tool Version 2.6.2 has been updated to include the new SWIFT™ Wireless addressable devices. In addition to SWIFT™ Wireless support, we have improved the support for low frequency by updating the B200SR-LF Low Frequency Sounder Base and the new ISO-6 Six Fault Isolator Module.

With the Lite-Configurator tool, you can:

  • Create a bill of material for addressable and conventional control panels
  • Select and edit parts from the parts catalog
  • Generate a formatted report with a customized header from your bill of materials
  • Export your bill of materials to MS Excel or MS Access
  • Create a full set of battery calculations based on your configuration
  • Print data sheets from the Bill of Materials screen.

To get started with the latest version of Lite-Configurator, click here to download the software.

Visit our website to learn more about Windows®-based software tools designed to assist Fire-Lite customers in the day-to-day business of selling and supporting fire alarm systems.

 

About the Author
George Goral is a NICET Level II Fire Products Application Specialist for Honeywell Fire Safety. He has 8 years of experience in technical support of fire alarm control panels including software support and the new SWIFT Wireless product line.

Spotlight on SWIFT Wireless: Retrieving Site Survey Data using the SWIFT Tools Software

In my previous blog, we learned that the SWIFT Wireless Site Survey results can be determined visually by the LED color and blink pattern. What if more detailed results are required? SWIFT Tools can provide these results!

After completion of the Link Test and or RF Scan the devices used for the test must be brought within 20’ of the PC with the USB adaptor running SWIFT Tools and removed from the bases.

From the main screen choose Site Survey:Site Survey Image 1 From the Communicator window select the devices that you want to retrieve data from, and click “Retrieve Data”:Site Survey Image 2

When the “Progress Status” shows Data Retrieved, click the “Next” button:Site Survey Image 3

The basic informative is displayed for the 3 categories, with a “Detailed View”for each and the option to “Export to Excel”:Site Survey Image 4

Detail View – Link Quality
Shows one excellent link  between detectors 101 and 102.Site Survey Image 5

Detail View – Channel Availability
Shows no problems, during test period (1 hr.) Site Survey Image 6

Detail View – Background Noise
Shows no problems, during test period (1 hr.) Site Survey Image 7

If you would like more information on SWIFT Wireless products, please visit www.firelitewireless.com.

Have questions?  Give Tech Support a call: 800-627-3473

 

About the Author
George Goral is a NICET Level II Fire Products Application Specialist for Honeywell Fire Safety. He has 8 years of experience in technical support of fire alarm control panels including software support and the new SWIFT Wireless product line.

PDF of Blog: Spotlight on SWIFT Wireless – Retrieving Site Survey Data using the SWIFT Tools Software

Wired vs. Wireless Fire Detection

For as long as there have been fire alarm systems, a wired connection has traditionally been the go-to solution. While these wired solutions still dominate the installations, wireless systems are making significant headway in the fire alarm market.

Technology is really going to be the driver here. Right now radio and battery technologies have some limitations, but as technology evolves, solutions will improve. You’re going to see capabilities, performance and battery life increase. Eventually there will be little-to-no wiring needed.

Here are a few things to think about when considering wired or wireless systems:

Wired
Readily accessible applications: Wired is beneficial for new installations where the fire alarm system can be installed as the building is going up. The installer will usually have easy access to pull the wire and can simply run it through the new facility.                                  

High-rises, airports, stadiums: Wired is still the best bet for applications that require emergency communication systems and mass notification, including applications that need speakers for voice alarms. If there are weather alerts or dangerous events, wired systems have been the traditional solution. However, wireless has a bright future for these applications.

Wireless
Retrofit applications: Wireless is valuable when the end user has to replace a system or add on to an existing system. Wireless can make it easy to get a new system up and running without the wiring headaches.

Historic buildings: Wireless does not get in the way of beautiful, visually sensitive architecture. Instead of marring an historic building with fire alarm cables, wireless systems can protect locations where appearance is paramount.

Faster jobs/temporary structures: Wireless gives contractors the opportunity to quickly complete installations. Pulling wires can consume a large portion of time on a job. What’s more, the system can quickly be installed and removed from temporary structures. Materials are not wasted, and the end user does not have to deal with segments of wire that are tough to reuse.

Outdoor applications: Wireless is much more reliable when the system needs to go outside from building to building and the location is prone to lightning strikes or other destructive weather events. Wired systems are more readily damaged in these situations.

Have you seen a rise in the use of wireless fire alarm systems in your area? Are you planning to use a wireless system on an upcoming project? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below.

 

About the Author
Jesse Otis is a Design Engineer in the Honeywell Fire Safety Americas Wireless Group.  Jesse joined Honeywell in 2003 and has been the lead engineer for the Fire Systems Group for the SWIFT products which launched last October. Jesse holds a B.S. degree in electrical engineering and is working to finish his Masters degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Systems Engineering.

Spotlight on SWIFT™ Wireless Tools: SWIFT™ Tools 1.5 USB Update

Fire-Lite has recently updated SWIFT Tools to version 1.5.

If you currently have the SWIFT™ USB, we recommend visiting www.firelite.com to update your tool version.

 

When upgrading to version 1.5 you may get the following message:SWIFT Tool Image 1

Go to Extras\Firmware Update\USB Adapter:SWIFT Tool Image 2

Browse to the location of the firmware file (USBAdaptorV1.1B4.bin ) click Open and then Update.SWIFT Tool Image 3

When complete you will receive the following message.SWIFT Tool Image 4

 

For more information on the SWIFT™ Wireless product line, visit: www.firelitewireless.com or our video library.

 

About the Author
George Goral is a NICET Level II Fire Products Application Specialist for Honeywell Fire Safety. He has 8 years of experience in technical support of fire alarm control panels including software support and the new SWIFT Wireless product line.

Spotlight on SWIFT™ Wireless: Site Survey

One of the many free and useful tools offered by Fire-Lite is the Site Survey Tool for SWIFT™ Wireless.  In a previous blog, we gave you an overview of the tool and what each pieces does for the system.

Let’s dig in a little more:

A Site Survey can be performed with as few as 2 detectors and we encourage a Site Survey to be performed “Pre-Installation” or possibly before quoting a job. The two part procedure (Link Test and RF Scan) will identify possible signal strength and interference issues due to construction and environmental issues.

With the first detector in Link Test mode, your second detector can be moved to different locations to check for potential signal strength problems between rooms or floors. The results can be visually determined by the number and color of the LED flashes. If using the SWIFT™ Tools software with the W-USB adapter, the results can be visually displayed as well as saved and printed.

Conducting a RF Scan will test for existing background noise and interference which could affect signal strength and communications.

For more information on the SWIFT™ Wireless product line, visit: www.firelitewireless.com or our video library.

 

 

About the Author
George Goral is a NICET Level II Fire Products Application Specialist for Honeywell Fire Safety. He has 8 years of experience in technical support of fire alarm control panels including software support, and the new SWIFT Wireless product line.

Another Successful NFPA!

We had a great week in Chicago at the NFPA Conference and Expo!

The booth stayed busy and we enjoyed the opportunity to chat with life safety professionals, like you, and introduce our newest products and solutions. The conference portion held over 120 sessions ranging from code updates, product introductions, technical trainings, and more.  Attendees really seemed engaged in the conversations and interested in what’s new in the industry.

If you missed the expo this year or want a little more information on what we were showing, here are a few products we highlighted in the display:

SWIFT™ Wireless    Less Wire. More Opportunities.FL-Wireless-collage-plain
Fire-Lite Alarms’ SWIFT™ wireless fire detection system detects fire, just like their wired counterparts, while providing installation flexibility in a wireless format. Our wireless system can use any combination of Fire-Lite monitor modules, smoke and/or heat detectors. In addition, both wired and wireless devices can be present on the same fire alarm control panel providing an integrated wired/wireless solution for increased installation potential.

Lite-Connect™   Connecting Fire Alarms the Easy Way
Lite-Connect™ is a solution that allows building owners reduce the number of phone lines by consolidating the central station ANN-LC - 175communications to a single MS-9050UD fire alarm control panel. Using fiber-optic technology, the panels are connected together and the MS-9050UD sends point or zone information to the Central Station for the entire system. In addition, building to building connections with fiber-optic cable avoids potential ground fault issues and damage caused by lightning strikes.

Remote Telephone Zone Module for the Emergency Command Center
Emergency Communications is about getting the right message to ECC-50-100_webthe right people at the right time. The RTZM (Remote Telephone Zone Module) gives an authorized end user access to the ECC during an emergency using any telephone. By adding the RTZM module to any ECC system, users have the ability to initiate pre-recorded messages or even make a live page.

Don’t forget about our library of free tools that were created to support the products and your business.

If you’ve never attended an NFPA Conference or Expo, it’s a wealth of information for both product and industry! If your business is involved with fire, don’t miss next year’s conference at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas, NV, June 13 – 16.

What was your favorite moment of NFPA 2015? Tweet us at @FireLiteAlarms or leave a comment below!

 

 

About the Author
Elizabeth Richards is the Manager of Communications for the SED Channel – Fire-Lite Alarms, Honeywell Power, and Silent Knight. Liz joined Honeywell Fire Systems in 2003 and is responsible for the communications, collateral, messaging, and events for all three brands.

What’s new for SWIFT Tools 1.5?

Fire-Lite Alarms’ SWIFT™ wireless fire detection system detects fires, just like their wired counterparts, while providing instalWhats-newlation flexibility in a wireless format. Our wireless system can use any combination of Fire-Lite monitor modules, smoke and/or heat detectors. For even more speed and flexibility, Fire-Lite has updated our SWIFT™ Tools Version 1.5 to incorporate numerous improvements to make your experience with SWIFT™ even better!

What we Improved

  • Devices are added to mesh network four times faster than before
  • Faster display of wireless device state changes
  • Devices now persist in graphical view until removed from the communicator
  • Live events have been reordered so that latest events are shown at the top of the list.
  • Improved W-USB dongle connectivity for SWIFT™ Tools
  • Profile assignment screen now only allows the selection of devices that are in factory default mode (devices that do not have a profile assigned)
  • Improvements for network statistics data

What we Added

  • Real time mesh display added when a user selects a gateway
  • The ability to change to a new or different database without re-launching SWIFT™ Tools
  • The ability to cancel an unwanted operation
  • Device sorting in graphical mesh search dropdown
  • Added an indication of beacon strength for W-USB adapter in communicator
  • Added the W-USB adapter compatibility check, and added build number to the revision number displayed

 

Unlike other wireless systems, the Fire-Lite SWIFT™ wireless system is based on a true mesh network that provides multiple paths of communication for each device. This increases system survivability, reliability while the overall system design ensures a secure and robust solution. Our SWIFT™ wireless system along with our enhancements to the tool ensures that any new fire alarm installation or retrofit job can be performed fast and cost effectively.

Looking for more information on SWIFT™ Wireless?   We have you covered with our online videos, product pages, webinars, and an infographic with examples of real applications!

Need more?  Let us know in the comments below!

 

About the Author
Ken Gentile is a Product Manager for Fire-Lite Alarms and Honeywell Power. Using his more than 15 years of marketing and engineering experience, Ken’s primary focus lies in the development of new products.

Less Wire and Fewer Battery Changes

SWIFT™ Wireless is now UL listed for a two year battery life! This is twice as long as the previous one year battery life listing. This is an exciting improvement for SWIFT™ Wireless as less batteries equals less service time and costs for you; therefore, making wireless a more competitive solution. In addition, replacing batteries during the annual service allows you to plan for the service versus unscheduled visits. If the service is missed, the Fire-Lite fire alarm control panel will provide an indication before the batteries need to be replaced.

When the time comes to replace the batteries, rest assured it’s easy to do. The CR123A or DL123A batteries are widely available and the process is quick:

  1.   Have 4 CR123A (or DL123A) batteries available.
  2.   The system allows 200 seconds to replace the batteries before the device is noted as missing and will activate the Rescue Mode within the wireless system.
  3.   Remove the detector from the base. Remove the faceplate from the module.
  4.   Open the battery compartment.
  5.   Remove the used batteries and replace with new batteries. The battery compartment is designed such that the batteries can only align in the appropriate direction.
  6.   Replace the battery compartment cover.
  7.   Return the device to its original location (if detector). Replace the faceplate (if module).

 

SWIFT™ Wireless has been used in a number of installations to protect people and property. To learn more about how SWIFT™ works, check out our product videos.

 

 

About the Author
Richard Conner is the Director of Marketing for Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight and Honeywell Power. Richard joined Honeywell in 2002 and has over 15 years of experience in the fire alarm industry in Marketing, Engineering, and Product Support positions. Richard is responsible for developing brand strategy and marketing programs for all brands.

The Basics of SWIFT Wireless Installation

The basics of installing a SWIFTTM wireless system can be summed up in several easy steps.

1.  Site Survey:
A Site Survey allows you to determine if a site is suitable for a SWIFTTM installation. Two tests are performed during this process:
a)   Link Quality Test – this test will determine if wireless devices can communicate between areas at acceptable signal strengths.
b)  RF Scan Test – A Radio Frequency scan test is conducted to assess and measure the background noise and interference from other wireless systems if any, in the site.

When the Site Survey tests are completed, the results can be viewed using SWIFTTM Tools.

2.  Mesh Formation:
If it is determined that the site is suitable, SWIFTTM Tools makes it easy to form a mesh network of devices.
a)  Create a Profile and Mesh ID – A profile is used to bind the devices in a mesh network together. The profile will contain a Mesh ID that is used when forming the associations. All devices in a mesh network require a common profile.
b) Distribute Profile – Distribute the profile to every device that will be a part of the mesh. This will enable all the devices that have that profile to form associative links when the mesh is formed.
c)  Mesh Formation – SWIFTTM Tools makes this an easy task. One click of a button will start the mesh formation and initial restructuring.

Anyone wanting a more comprehensive view on how to install a SWIFTTM wireless system is encouraged to attend a Fire-Lite Academy.

 

About the Author
Tom Rosa oversees all Fire-Lite Alarms training programs as a Training Supervisor for Honeywell Fire Systems. With more than a decade of experience as a Fire-Lite trainer and the support of a strong team of experienced, NICET-certified trainers, Tom guides the content and methods by which the company educates Fire-Lite users throughout the United States and Caribbean.

Fire-Lite SWIFT Wireless – Top 10 Questions & Answers

Fire-Lite Alarms recently introduced the new and innovative SWIFT Wireless solution. Wireless technology can help you overcome installation challenges, which makes SWIFT ideal solution for your applications. There is great interest in SWIFT Wireless and we would like to help you learn more by providing the top 10 questions and answers about the products.

1. What is a Class-A Mesh Network? Why is that important with this system?

Class-A is a communications classification where a single fault does not obstruct the system operation. In our case, the mesh network implements redundant paths for all communications, so a single instance when communication is disrupted will not impede the products performance. In wired circuits, this means that a single open circuit or a single short circuit on the communication lines will not prevent the circuit from functioning (typically because there is an alternate/return path). In wireless communications there are no open or short circuit conditions, but there are times when a communication may be blocked (interference or physical blockage). SWIFT implements two communication paths, so even if one is blocked, the message still gets through.

2. What panels are supported? Any plans for the 9050?

The MS-9200UDLS and the MS-9600(UD)LS are supported in LiteSpeed™ mode. There are currently no plans for the MS-9050UD.

3. What do you mean by overlapping? Examples of overlapping?

Overlap occurs when a mesh network is in radio range of another mesh network, creating the opportunity for a transmission in a mesh to interfere with the communication of another mesh. This could be with a system installed on the 1st floor of a multi-story building overlapping with a second network installed on the 2nd floor of a multi-story building. SWIFT Wireless supports a scheme where 4 mesh networks can co-existence in the same RF environment (overlapping) without interfering with each other – This is the limit. If there is a 5th mesh network added to the overlap condition then a system trouble will be indicated for each network that is compromised by the condition.

4. What information can you pull from the wireless detectors?

In panel read status you will have all the capabilities you would get with your wired device (snapshot of chamber values, database settings). With SWIFT Tools, you can retrieve statistics which will have the battery voltages, communication links and signal strength, noise floor measurements, etc. You can also retrieve wireless history from the gateway.

5. What does the SWIFT tool help with?

The tool provides visibility to the radio communication. It has three main functions.
–  Extract and analyze site survey data; providing recommendations.
–  Installation (assigning profiles, removing profiles, starting/stopping mesh formation, etc.)
–  Diagnostics (viewing mesh infrastructure, statistics, history, signal strengths, battery information)

6. Will there be more information on the SWIFT tool available? Online training?

There are a series of short videos on YouTube to demonstrate the capabilities of not only the SWIFT tool, but the SWIFT products in general.

7. How can you get a local AHJ to accept wireless?

Wireless technology is already accepted in many jurisdictions. If you need help with approval in your jurisdiction, please contact a Regional Sales Manager.

8. What is Clip Mode v LiteSpeed™?

Both are communication protocols between the Fire-Lite fire alarm control panels and the addressable devices. LiteSpeed™ is an advanced communication protocol capable of higher speeds enabling additional features. LiteSpeed™ is only supported on the MS-9200UDLS and MS- 9600(UD)LS.

9. What happens at the panel when a device is off or out of service? What shows on the panel? Or ANN-80-W?

The point will be an invalid reply (INVREP) at the FACP. In addition, on the ANN-80-W you may have a latching event to indicate tamper if the device was removed from the base or you may have a latching low battery trouble if the device is completely inoperable.

10. Is there a wireless system guide? Any way to work up a quote without doing a site survey?

A simple site survey is the best way to gauge if the environment is conducive to wireless technology. Without doing a site survey, there is a risk that certain aspects of the building have a negative effect of signal strength.

 

Want to learn more? Visit www.firelite.com to watch a 2 minute video, view a full-length webinar, or read the product literature.

 

 

About the Author
Richard Conner is the Director of Marketing for the SED Channel – Fire-Lite Alarms, Silent Knight, and Honeywell Power. Richard joined Honeywell in 2002 and has over 15 years of experience in the fire alarm industry in Marketing, Engineering, and Product Support positions. Richard is responsible for developing brand strategy and marketing programs for all brands.